Applied Medical Bridge 

Project Description For this project, a bridge was constructed between two buildings and a central plant was built on the bridge to tie both buildings together.  The project included (3) chillers, (3) cooling towers, pumps, VFDs, air handler unit, exhaust and supply fans, chilled water piping, (3) boilers, hot water piping, valves, air separators, balance and LEED commissioning.  

Service Plans and Specifications
 

 

General Contractor            
DBAC, Inc. 

Mechanical Engineer            
P2S Engineering 

Contract Amount            
$2.2 million 

Completion                
2015 


Disneyland East Plant Cooling Tower Replacement

Project Description This project included the replacement of (3) cooling towers, cooling tower frames with structural footings, (3) pumps, and underground distribution piping ranging from 18” to 24”.  The existing towers and structures were removed and disposed of.  Temporary towers were installed so that operation in the park was not interrupted.  As the general contractor, we were also responsible for the structural system and controls. 

Service Plans and Specifications

 

General Contractor             
Plumbing, Piping, and Construction, Inc. 

Mechanical Engineer             
Goss Engineering
 
Contract Amount            
$1.4 million 

Completion                
August 2015 


USC Central Plant Parking Structure A

Project Description PPC constructed a new central plant utilizing space in and around the existing Parking Structure A.  The mechanical portion consisted of the installation of (2) 1,250-ton water-cooled chillers, (3) cooling towers, chilled water pumps, condenser water pumps, air handler units, central plant pipe valves and fittings with VFD’s, distribution piping,  and mechanical exhaust system.  The Plumbing portion of the project included the addition of floor sinks, floor drains, waste, vent, and water.  

Service Design and Build, BIM

 

Mechanical Engineer            
P2S Engineering 

Contract Amount            
$7.8 million 

Completion                
February 2014     


Disney’s California Adventure Central Energy Plant

Project Description  PPC replaced the chilled water supply and return piping and installed Victaulic fittings with welded joints.   

Service Plans and Specifications, BIM

 

General Contractor             
Plumbing, Piping and Construction, Inc.                       

Mechanical Engineer             
Disneyland Resort: in-house design and engineering. 
 
Contract Amount            
$472,000

Completion               
April 2014


Fox Studios Central Plant

Description of Project    
Construction of the central plant included a 750-ton fan chiller, pumps, VFD’s, air separator, expansion tank, piping system, DDC controls, and commissioning.  The central plant was constructed within an existing historic building. 

Service Plans and Specifications

 

General Contractor             
Plumbing, Piping and Construction, Inc.             
                    
Mechanical Engineer            
Glumac 

Contract Amount     
$2.5 million 

Completion                
January 2014


County of Orange Central Utility Facility Cooling Tower Replacement

Description of Project   
The project included removing the visual screen around the existing four cooling towers and replacing them with new structural supports.  The Cooling Towers were repaired and the 18” condenser water supply and return piping was replaced with 24”.  The project’s goals were to remove known seismic risks and to lower risk of service disruption.  The Central Utility Facility provides steam and cooling 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 

Service Plans and Specifications

 

General Contractor             
Plumbing, Piping, and Construction, Inc.     

Mechanical Engineer             
P2S

Contract Amount            
$2.1 million  

Completion               
December 2014


San Bernardino Valley College Central Plant

Project Description PPC constructed a 2,442 sq. ft. single story Central Plant building housing mechanical, electrical and plumbing equipment. Mechanical system includes 2 VFD electrical centrifugal 600-ton chillers, associated chilled and condenser water pumps, above and below grade chilled and condenser water piping, hydronic accessories and controls, air intake louver, high and low ventilation ductwork. The Cooling tower yard and thermal energy storage tank area, 3,968 sq. ft., includes 2 VFD cooling towers above and below chilled and condenser water piping, cooling tower chemical water treatment system, condenser water filtration system, hydronic accessories and controls. The 22,000 linear feet of chilled water supply and return piping from the central plant through the existing campus to feed all existing campus buildings. The TES is Design Build – 738,000 gallon 65’-0”; 45’-0” wide thermal energy storage tank that stores chilled water for campus air conditioning.   The project took place while the College was in session, minimal disruption to the students and to the faculty was of key importance.  A tight schedule of 365 days from NTP.

Service TES tank portion of project - Design Build;
Plans and Specifications

 

Mechanical Engineer
P2S Engineering 

Contract Amount           
$10.7 million 

Completion                
March 2013 

Location of Project             
San Bernardino, CA


Paramount Studios Central Plant, Stages and Studios, Phase I & II

Project Description  Our team worked with Paramount Studios for approximately 18 months to identify their goals, design the projects, create and update budget costs.  The construction schedule was created taking into account Paramount’s constraints.  The schematic design, the design development and the construction development designs were completed within 4 months.  The projects included construction of a Cooling Tower Yard and converting an existing Power House Building to a new Central Plant Building. The central plant was constructed within an existing building and houses the chiller, electrical and control room. The cooling tower, condenser water system, make-up water and filtration systems are housed in an adjacent yard. Chilled water is provided to the campus through an underground and aboveground distribution system.  A flexible initial design was used so that the chiller plant could be expanded for an additional chiller in Phase II.  Phase II included a 750 ton chiller, pumps, an absorption chiller with two co-generation units, and additional campus piping. 

Service Design and Build

 

Mechanical Engineer
P2S Engineering             

Contract Amount            
Phase I: $7.4 million
Phase II: $10.7

Completion                
Phase I: April 2010
Phase II: January 2013    
        
Unique Features    
The existing HVAC system for the buildings consisted of inefficient, high maintenance systems. The studio desired to replace these systems, with a centralized, energy efficient central plant with strict sound dissipation goals. The visual impact of the system was of importance.  The studio was operational during construction; therefore great efforts were taken to minimize interference with productions. PPC held the contract direct with Paramount Pictures and led the design and build team.


Citrus Community College Central Plant

Project Description PPC constructed a new central plant building that houses the cooling and heating equipment, electrical, and control systems.  An adjacent open yard houses the cooling tower, make-up water and filtration systems.  Chilled and heating hot water is provided to the campus through an underground and above-ground distribution system.  The cooling equipment consisted of (2) 600-ton chillers, primary and secondary pumping systems with TES tank.  The heating equipment consists of (6) high-efficiency hot water boilers and primary variable flow pumping systems.  

Service Plans and Specifications

 

General Contractor            
Plumbing, Piping, and Construction, Inc.  

Mechanical Engineer           
P2S Engineering 

Contract Amount            
$6.8 million  

Completion               
October 2007

Unique Features     
The project took place while the College was in session, so minimal disruption to the students and the faculty was of key importance.